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Sucre's Charm Wears Thin

Sucre, Bolivia

sunny 24 °C
View South American odyssey on tlbaker's travel map.

Our stop in the lovely city of Sucre was meant to be short and sweet, however we were about to experience the famous Bolivian past-time of protests. The next morning we attempted to pre-book an overnight bus to La Paz for the following day, which is when we learned that all major Bolivian cities had been blockaded by farmers, miners and health workers who were demanding pay increases. No one had any idea how long the blockades would last, so we decided to wait and see if we could book a bus the next day.

Blockade in Sucre

Blockade in Sucre

Sucre is another lovely old Colonial city, full of white buildings - houses, apartments, restaurants and pubs. It is the official capital of Bolivia according to the constitution, where independence was first declared but currently only holds judicial power.

Sucre Church

Sucre Church

Ali ringing church bell

Ali ringing church bell

We took a tour of the independence museum, which was actually very interesting, illustrating Bolivia's journey to independence and its historical alliance with Argentina. There is a running theme in all accounts of Bolivia's history that the country never got a fair go, with Spain pilfering all its precious metals and the final nail in the coffin was when Chile annexed its only coastal land, leaving Bolivia totally land-locked.

Simon Bolivar (Revolutionary General of South America and Bolivia's Namesake

Simon Bolivar (Revolutionary General of South America and Bolivia's Namesake

Original Argentinian Flag with Reverse Colours to Current Flag

Original Argentinian Flag with Reverse Colours to Current Flag

Sucre had an awesome fresh food market, which was conveniently located opposite our hostel. We spent some time strolling through the stalls of spicy chorizo, meat and cheese filled pastries known as 'saltenas,' fresh juice stands and the vast fruit and vegetables.

Ali lining up at the Juice and Smoothie Stands at the Markets

Ali lining up at the Juice and Smoothie Stands at the Markets

Spices at the Markets

Spices at the Markets

Shopkeeper in Markets

Shopkeeper in Markets

The next day we pretty had very little left, and as Travis could not find a motorcycle tour with anyone else signed up we decided to check out the Parrque Cretacios and a lookout for sunset. The Parque Cretacios is a dinosaur park from which you can view dinosaur footprints exposed by the quarrying of a mountain. Unfortunately the viewing platform is so far away from the footprints due to the quarry still functioning that it was rather disappointing. However the tacky life-size models made the trip worth while.

Parque Cretacious

Parque Cretacious

Dinosaur Footprints (from afar)

Dinosaur Footprints (from afar)

Life-size Brontosaurus

Life-size Brontosaurus

T-Rex Model

T-Rex Model

Just before sunset we hiked up to the area of Recoleta where a Mirador (lookout) sits above the city. Complete with a garden cafe and deck chairs to kick back on while enjoying a drink, we watched the sun set dramatically over the city.

Sunset over Sucre

Sunset over Sucre

Sunset over Sucre

Sunset over Sucre

Our first accommodation was not the most sociable place, so after two nights we moved to a hostel with a livelier atmosphere. Here, while unfortunately Ali suffered the effects of another stomach bug, Trav had a few drinks with fellow travellers and later more capirinhas at a local bar.

Recoleta, Sucre

Recoleta, Sucre

The next day was a write-off with Ali sick in bed, so Travis made some good use of the many Gringo bars to update blogs and watch some football matches.

Travis with Macho Pique (Bolivian traditional food only for macho men)

Travis with Macho Pique (Bolivian traditional food only for macho men)

The next afternoon, since there was still no certainty about the road blocks stopping and no agreement reached between the protesters and the government, we got on our pre-booked flight to La Paz, travelling business class. Taking only 45 minutes compared to a bumpy 12 hours by road, we happily stretched out and enjoyed the views of La Paz as we descended.

Travis in Business Class

Travis in Business Class

Posted by tlbaker 16:29 Archived in Bolivia Tagged architecture sunset colonial

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